different playing field

The Discreet Power of Blogging Is Allowing Women to Express Their Expertise

No longer simple online diaries, blogs offer a platform for women to find their voices as experts and opinion-makers. LONDON, U.K—The media environment is mostly male-dominated. News is written by men and about men, and female journalists, experts and sources remain underrepresented. Data show how media organizations—in the U.K. and the Western world generally—perpetrate a systematic marginalization of women, and an increasing number of them have turned to the digital sphere to claim a public space through personal channels, social media and blogs. Blogging has often been praised for validating female voices, allowing them unprecedented freedom to publish original and unfiltered content, regardless of mainstream agendas and focuses.

Recent Posts

We Need to Talk About Non-Gender-Conforming Media Workers, Too

Women’s magazine Marie Claire announced last July the addition of a new name to its masthead: author Janet Mock was named contributing editor. The news received wide media attention, not just because of Mock’s résumé but because of her gender identity as well. Mock is a professional writer who happens to be a transsexual woman. In the stories about her appointment, her gender identity and her new job were talked about in the same breath. Student Reporter talked with transsexual and intersex journalists about their perspectives on having a presence, voice and career in the media.

Women at War #2

The Local Women Who Hold Up the Sky in Syria

In between the headlines on deaths and the fighting between Assad and the rebels, readers forget about the lives of those caught in the Syrian conflict, women’s lives in particular. The Syrian Female Journalist Network aims to bring stories to media attention by training male and female journalists in the region.