Recent Posts

Student Reporter is now Pro Journo

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In 2011, when Tim founded Student Reporter as part of his oikos Phd fellowship, he envisioned to build The Economist for young people.

Why We Need Agile Servant Leaders

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Do world leaders have the big picture and a good understanding of the world we live in? A Q&A with Gilbert Probst from the World Economic Forum on his new book, “Tackling Complexity.”

Can Tech Entrepreneurship Be a Solution to Youth Unemployment in Egypt?

Two attendees of the Maker Faire Africa show the entrepreneurial spirit nascent in Cairo and beyond.

Following the Arab Spring, observers in Egypt have noticed that more and more young people are interested in entrepreneurship and self-employment. Tech entrepreneurship especially is gaining increasing institutional support. Some even see it as a means of mitigating the country’s record-setting unemployment that has largely afflicted Egypt’s youth (80 percent of those unemployed are under 30). “Egyptians have been facing drastic sociopolitical and economic changes,” says Dalia Mohamad Abd-Allah, a young entrepreneur from Cairo. “Since young people have played a role in that change, they are getting a sense of ownership of their own destiny.

State of Nature: In “Windfall,” Journalist McKenzie Funk Recasts the Conversation About Climate Change

On an expedition in Bolivia.

Journalist McKenzie Funk is an adventurer, as much in his intellectual pursuits as in his taste for sport. He would rather climb a 26,000-foot mountain than hang with the press corps. So it is with his new book, “Windfall: The Booming Business of Global Warming,” which recounts myriad efforts to cash in on climate change. An absurd display of Canadian militarism first piqued Funk’s interest in the topic. In 2006, he found himself aboard the Canadian frigate HMCS Montréal as it surged toward the Northwest Passage.

Fixing the Freelance Future: E-Work’s Brave New World Comes With Serious Drawbacks

As the next billion people come online, nations will need to ensure that their labor forces aren’t shortchanged in a hyper-competitive world.

Science writer Julian Taub has been freelancing for close to three years now. He has written for prominent publications, believes he has a strong network and understands what it takes to land work. Yet writing for the Web on a contingent basis hasn’t been easy. As Taub points out, he “would be afraid to do it as [his] sole source of income. Just because it’s very precarious: You don’t know what’s going to come up, there’s not many guarantees, and it’s really tough to be one step ahead” on a beat.