Sunmin Kim

Sunmin Kim

Sunmin is Pro Journo's executive director and also deputy editor at The Economist Intelligence Unit (The Economist's research arm) where she covers business and technology primarily for North America. Her writing has appeared in Economist Insights, The Huffington Post, GreenBiz, the World Economic Forum Blog and more. She received her MS in Mechanical Engineering at the University of Michigan and BS in Biological Engineering at Cornell University and patented on a method to pattern quantum dots (nanoparticles that have semiconductor properties). She is based in New York City.

Recent Posts

Student Reporter is now Pro Journo

In 2011, when Tim founded Student Reporter as part of his oikos Phd fellowship, he envisioned to build The Economist for young people.

Apply: Student Reporter Editor Fellowship 2014

A 4-month fellowship program for journalism students to launch and manage their coverage project around a business or economics phenomena. Each fellow receives a stipend of $3,000(US) and project budget capped at $4,000 which can be used for recruiting writers, field reporting trips, events, and travel.

Community and Marketing Manager (contract/PT)

Student Reporter, a global media outlet and journalism incubator, is hiring for a part-time Community and Marketing Manager to: 1) help us manage our international community of writers, 2) grow our outlet’s readership through social media marketing and 3) assist in market research to ready the next stage in our venture as a global media company start-up. Requirements

Bachelors or above in Marketing, Business, Journalism, or similar degree. Background and literacy in digital media, journalism, and/or business news. Experience (internship/PT ok) and demonstrable skills in social media and community management. Knowledge of audience engagement tactics and metrics of news media outlets.

Be a Reporter at the World Economic Forum 2014, Davos-Switzerland

“Davos is the mother of all conferences,” a WEF Annual Meeting attendee once told us last year. Besides the official (and secret, private) program that has been under development for the entire year by a dedicated team at the Forum, what else makes Davos, well, Davos?

We Recruit: Copy Editor (Freelance)

This position is now closed. We are hiring for a copy editor on a freelance basis to support the publisher by taking over proofreading in grammar and style. Qualifications:

Excellent command of the English language (American preferable, British ok). Excellent knowledge and experience in AP Style. 3+ yrs of professional experience in journalism or copy editing of journalistic writing (news, profiles, opinion).

From Classroom to Newsroom: Guide to the Pro Journo Pitch

NEW YORK & ZURICH – We published here general tips in pitching to editors. Here at Pro Journo, pitching is the most critical step for both first-time and seasoned reporters to ensure that we keep writing stories that are newsworthy and relevant. And for many of our applications, we ask you to practice this because this is oftentimes the toughest hurdle that young writers face in transitioning from writing analytical papers for an academic audience to writing impactful stories for a general audience through journalism. Journalism vs Academic Writing
What makes a piece of writing journalism instead of academic writing? Here are our five principles:

Know your audience.

Call for Applications: Social Innovations Russia

A strange mix of developing and developed country, social entrepreneurship in Russia will be like nowhere else, and the efforts to create it are only just beginning. We are recruiting two reporters to report at the helm of this phenomenon by covering the first international conference on social innovation in Russia, called “Social Innovations Russia”.

Reforming the Business School, a Pure Product of American Culture

The fact that higher education, especially business education, is in need of reform is not news. But the role of the humanities in such reform has been gaining momentum in the U.S., mostly in reaction to a recently published report by the American Academy of Arts & Sciences, a sort of “humanities rescue plan.” As we see in our coverage of the Carnegie Roundtables, this is a conversation that has materialized as a movement in both the U.S. and Europe, with a gathering of key departments, faculty and major universities.